Lectures and publications

OPTATEC 2010 - "Integrated Process Chain for Precision Molding of Glass Optics"

15.06.10
P1140439
P1140439
Berbnd Bresseler
Bernd Bresseler

VDI Workshop on "Molded Optics"

01.12.09
VDI
Berbnd Bresseler
Bernd Bresseler
Dus_Digi_001[907]
Dus_Digi_001[907]
Chair of the workshop was Prof. Dr. Fritz Klocke from Fraunhofer Institute of Production Technology IPT.
Aixtooling GmbH participated in the workshop with its own presentation on the subject of mold making for precision molding of optical glass (see attachment). In detail the following subjects are to be covered:

  • potential and implementation options of micro-optics
  • production-appropriate design
  • materials
  • molding tools and machines
  • processes
  • measurement and quality assurance

Please find the program as well as the Aixtooling publication attached.

Aixtooling's presentation at the 19th World of Photonics Congress

17.06.09
Guido Pongs
Guido Pongs
laser2007_as2498
laser2007_as2498

5th International Colloquium on Optics "Optics - Key Technology for the Future"

18.03.09
Berbnd Bresseler
Bernd Bresseler
Quellenhof_tcm234-141651
Quellenhof_tcm234-141651
Optikkolloquium 2009 Plenum

2009 in optics and precision engineering

31.12.08
Jahrbuch Optik 2009
Jahrbuch Optik 2009

Tool making as the standard - ultra-precision mold tools for the precision molding of optical glass

30.03.07
Mikroproduktion 03/2007

Advanced Optics Using Aspherical Elements (SPIE Press Book)

01.10.07
Advanced Optics Using Aspherical Elements
Fachbuch
Modern optical imaging systems today achieve a performance that would have been considered unimaginable in past years. The same is true of optics for communication applications, measurement tasks, materials processing, etc. These performance increases are due both to the use of new materials and to the introduction of new surface machining and assembly processes. The essential improvement is that the physics of material loss in polishing and that of material deposition in coating have been quantitatively understood to such a degree that these processes can now be modeled mathematically, permitting computer-controlled implementation.
This progress now makes it possible to use aspherical optics to a greater extent in high-performance optics systems, an innovation that, due to cost reasons, has previously been impossible in the scope needed for the mass products dominated by Asia, for instance in cameras for cell phones.

However, estimating the opportunities and risks of the use of aspherical optics requires knowledge of the entire value-added chain, including design, materials properties, surface processing variants, metrology techniques, coating concepts, and system assembly. However, only experts on the everyday frontline of technology can provide reliable information on these matters. This is the reason this book contains contributions regarding these subjects of almost 60 authors from 30 well-known optics companies and institutes in the German-speaking world.

On a positive note, many of the authors and their companies and institutes are associated with DGaO as members, which can be seen as a sign of the collegiality across company borders traditionally maintained in the field of optics.

The contributions, submitted in template form, are complemented by a didactical introduction including an evaluation and summary of the contributions and an outlook on future trends. This part was essentially compiled by the editors B. Braunecker (former head of the optics development at Leica Geosystems AG in Heerbrugg), R. Hentschel (former head of optics production at Schott AG), and Prof. H. Tiziani, honorary member of DGaO and longstanding head of the Institute for Technical Optics at the University of Stuttgart.

The goal of the book is to show the most suitable path through the value-added chain for each optical application, thus not only to understand the methods recommended, but also to recognize their limitations and to estimate the costs of investment and operations. At the same time, more detailed information on the Internet is identified. The book is recommended not only for technical experts, but also for decision makers and consultants.

Not ground but still as smooth as polished: Molding of optical glass is replacing grinding and polishing.

24.04.06
Glasoptik-Fertigung auf Toshiba-Maschinen: Das Präzisionsblankpressen nimmt mehrere Minuten Zeit in Anspruch und hat einbaufertige Linsen zum Ergebnis (Bilder: Fraunhofer IPT)
Industrieanzeigher 2006

4th International Colloquium on Optics "Optics - Key Technology for the Future"

18.03.09
Berbnd Bresseler
Bernd Bresseler
Quellenhof_tcm234-141651
Quellenhof_tcm234-141651
Today advanced optics and optical systems are essential components which enable innovative product developments especially in several fast growing industries. Due to the ongoing demands for mobility and resolution optical systems are designed with lower weight and smaller size. In this context glass optics are continuously in competition to plastic optics, but often its stable optical performances make them the preferred materials. The trend is obvious - the rising demand for optical elements with increasing geometrical complexity. Aspherical optics, diffractive optical elements, and monolythical lens arrays are already implemented to compensate the limitations of spherical components.
Direct optical manufacturing i.e. by pre-grinding, finish grinding and polishing is an established process chain for standard optics. It can produce lenses with higher geometrical accuracy and surface quality with adequate cost efficiency, although, the process chain requires extensive technological know-how. Comprehensive automation strategies are therefore difficult to implement. Conventional glass optics manufacturing plants are characterized by manual procedures and significant dependency on empirical knowledge. Direct manufacture of complex shaped optical elements requires significantly more efforts. Several process steps on different advanced machine tools have to be chained and fed back which results in long manufacturing times and high costs per piece. Of course these process chains are justified and required when highest accuracies on large optics are needed. A typical example is the manufacture of ultra precise optics for wafer steppers for microlithography.
However, there exists a large demand for complex imaging optics with medium accuracy (i.e. l/4-l/6). These optics are used in many applications within consumer electronics, laser technology, automotive or life science industry.
One promising approach to fill this gap is the replicative production technology. Europe is in an excellent position in the design and development of advanced optical systems. However, many industries have been transferring their production to low-wage countries.
The application of precision glass moulding - as one example of replicative manufacturing - utilizes our strengths. It is designed for automation, the high requirement for technological know-how and the minimum process steps to just one manufacturing device precision glass moulding is destined to become an important technology for the european optical industry.


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